Services

Full Service Inspection

Veritas inspection services provides the following types of drill pipe, tubing, and casing inspection by certified professional inspectors:

  • Visual Connection
  • Visual Tube
  • Dimensional 1
  • Dimensional 2
  • OD Gage
  • UT Wall Thickness
  • EMI
  • MPI Slip/Upset
  • UT Slip/Upset
  • FLUT 2
  • Traceability
  • Blacklight Connection
  • Wet Visible Contrast
Veritas Full Service Inspection

Hardbanding

Veritas Hardbanding Services

Veritas applies industry leading wear-resistant alloy to the tool joints of drill-pipe or drill collars to extend the life and reduce downtime.  Hardbanding is applied where rotational and axial friction created from drilling and tripping create excessive abrasive wear between the drill-string and casing and/or rock. Hard alloy overlays are applied to the points of greatest friction by using advanced welding techniques.  Downhole conditions determine the welds we use, we can select extreme wear to less abrasive alloys.  We can help you discover a balanced and effective solution which offers both casing wear defense and tool joint protection caused by highly deviated wells.

Hardbanding services can be completed at our facility or on location with our state of the art mobile unit.

Veritas Thermal Spray and Coating

Coatings

Veritas is proud to offer patent-pending thermal spray coatings to mitigate drill pipe, sucker rod, and production tubing wear and corrosion problems.  Based on experience gained from the use of proprietary alloys applied by thermal spray, we have initiated a program addressing wear and corrosion with success we are documenting in several case studies. Veritas Coatings also provides the most durable ESP thermal spray in the industry – please contact us if you would like to protect your submersible pump, motor, or seal/protector

Drill Pipe

Veritas offers drill pipe sales and rental:

  • 4” Drill Pipe DS1
  • 4” HWDP DS1
  • 4 1/2” HWDP with 4 1/2” X-Hole Connection
  • 5” Drill Pipe DS1
  • 5” HWDP DS1
  • 4” MISC SUBS DS1
Veritas Drill Pipe Rental and Sales
Veritas Rattling Services

Rattling

Veritas rattling service works with all O.E.M. production, drilling, and casing inventory and offers the expertise and experience to provide service that is specific to your cleaning requirements. We only use equipment known for its quality, durability, versatility, and dependability when it comes to cleaning applications for tubing, drill pipe and casing.

Risk Management & Mitigation

 Veritas excels in assessing organizational security risk and providing recommendations that have an immediate and long-term impact on the bottom line.  We specialize in providing security protection and training solutions to private and government entities - facilitating and maintaining all contracts while striving to consistently exceed customer expectations is at the core of our operations.  Showcasing a background in security services from Baghdad, Iraq to Hollywood, CA our expertise is dependable with more than 30 years of combined experience.

Services Offered:

  • Consulting
  • Investigations
  • Risk Assessment
  • Loss Prevention
  • Executive Protection
  • Site & Threat Assessment
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Workplace Violence Training
  • Event Management
  • Physical Security Systems
  • Risk Management & Reduction
  • Security Documentation

Certifications:

  • SWAT & Drug Enforcement Training
  • Certified Drug Enforcement Trainer
  • First Responder & CPR Certified
  • Piston & Shotgun LE Instructor
  • Tactical Shooting LE Instructor
  • Range Safety Officer
  • Advanced Tactical Pistol & Assault Rifle
  • Antiterrorism Officer Level II
Risk Management and Mitigation by Veritas Drilling
Veritas Drilling Welding Services

Welding

Veritas welding offers the advantages of hiring a professional welding company with the equipment to complete any project within all of our service areas.  We offer all of the following processes:

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by an inert shielding gas (argon or helium), and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds, do not require it. A constant-current welding power supply produces energy which is conducted across the arc through a column of highly ionized gas and metal vapors known as a plasma.

GTAW is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and copper alloys. The process grants the operator greater control over the weld than competing processes such as shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding, allowing for stronger, higher quality welds. However, GTAW is comparatively more complex and difficult to master, and furthermore, it is significantly slower than most other welding techniques.

Gas metal arc welding (GMAW), sometimes referred to by its subtypes metal inert gas (MIG) welding or metal active gas (MAG) welding, is a welding process in which an electric arc forms between a consumable wire electrode and the workpiece metal(s), which heats the workpiece metal(s), causing them to melt, and join. Along with the wire electrode, a shielding gas feeds through the welding gun, which shields the process from contaminants in the air.  The process can be semi-automatic or automatic. A constant voltage, direct current power source is most commonly used with GMAW, but constant current systems, as well as alternating current, can be used. There are four primary methods of metal transfer in GMAW, called globular, short-circuiting, spray, and pulsed-spray, each of which has distinct properties and corresponding advantages and limitations.  Originally developed for welding aluminum and other non-ferrous materials in the 1940s, GMAW was soon applied to steels because it provided faster welding time compared to other welding processes. The cost of inert gas limited its use in steels until several years later, when the use of semi-inert gases such as carbon dioxide became common. Further developments during the 1950s and 1960s gave the process more versatility and as a result, it became a highly used industrial process. Today, GMAW is the most common industrial welding process, preferred for its versatility, speed and the relative ease of adapting the process to robotic automation. Unlike welding processes that do not employ a shielding gas, such as shielded metal arc welding, it is rarely used outdoors or in other areas of air volatility. A related process, flux cored arc welding, often does not use a shielding gas, but instead employs an electrode wire that is hollow and filled with flux.

One of the most common types of arc welding is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), which is also known as manual metal arc welding (MMAW) or stick welding, as shown above.  An electric current is used to strike an arc between the base material and a consumable electrode rod or stick. The electrode rod is made of a material that is compatible with the base material being welded and is covered with a flux that gives off vapors that serve as a shielding gas and provide a layer of slag, both of which protect the weld area from atmospheric contamination. The electrode core itself acts as filler material, making a separate filler unnecessary. The process is very versatile, requiring little operator training and inexpensive equipment. However, weld times are rather slow, since the consumable electrodes must be frequently replaced and because slag, the residue from the flux, must be chipped away after welding. Furthermore, the process is generally limited to welding ferrous materials, though specialty electrodes have made possible the welding of cast iron, nickel, aluminum, copper and other metals. The versatility of the method makes it popular in a number of applications including repair work and construction.

Full Service Inspection

Veritas Full Service Inspection

Veritas inspection services provides the following types of drill pipe, tubing, and casing inspection by certified professional inspectors:

  • Visual Connection
  • Visual Tube
  • Dimensional 1
  • Dimensional 2
  • OD Gage
  • UT Wall Thickness
  • EMI
  • MPI Slip/Upset
  • UT Slip/Upset
  • FLUT 2
  • Traceability
  • Blacklight Connection
  • Wet Visible Contrast

Hardbanding

Veritas Hardbanding Services

Veritas applies industry leading wear-resistant alloy to the tool joints of drill-pipe or drill collars to extend the life and reduce downtime.  Hardbanding is applied where rotational and axial friction created from drilling and tripping create excessive abrasive wear between the drill-string and casing and/or rock. Hard alloy overlays are applied to the points of greatest friction by using advanced welding techniques.  Downhole conditions determine the welds we use, we can select extreme wear to less abrasive alloys.  We can help you discover a balanced and effective solution which offers both casing wear defense and tool joint protection caused by highly deviated wells.

Hardbanding services can be completed at our facility or on location with our state of the art mobile unit.

Coatings

Veritas Thermal Spray and Coating

Veritas is proud to offer patent-pending thermal spray coatings to mitigate drill pipe, sucker rod, and production tubing wear and corrosion problems.  Based on experience gained from the use of proprietary alloys applied by thermal spray, we have initiated a program addressing wear and corrosion with success we are documenting in several case studies. Veritas Coatings also provides the most durable ESP thermal spray in the industry – please contact us if you would like to protect your submersible pump, motor, or seal/protector

Drill Pipe

Veritas Drill Pipe Rental and Sales

Veritas offers drill pipe sales and rental:

  • 4” Drill Pipe DS1
  • 4” HWDP DS1
  • 4 1/2” HWDP with 4 1/2” X-Hole Connection
  • 5” Drill Pipe DS1
  • 5” HWDP DS1
  • 4” MISC SUBS DS1

Rattling

Veritas Rattling Services

Veritas rattling service works with all O.E.M. production, drilling, and casing inventory and offers the expertise and experience to provide service that is specific to your cleaning requirements. We only use equipment known for its quality, durability, versatility, and dependability when it comes to cleaning applications for tubing, drill pipe and casing.

Risk Management & Mitigation

Risk Management and Mitigation by Veritas Drilling

 Veritas excels in assessing organizational security risk and providing recommendations that have an immediate and long-term impact on the bottom line.  We specialize in providing security protection and training solutions to private and government entities - facilitating and maintaining all contracts while striving to consistently exceed customer expectations is at the core of our operations.  Showcasing a background in security services from Baghdad, Iraq to Hollywood, CA our expertise is dependable with more than 30 years of combined experience.

Services Offered:

  • Consulting
  • Investigations
  • Risk Assessment
  • Loss Prevention
  • Executive Protection
  • Site & Threat Assessment
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Workplace Violence Training
  • Event Management
  • Physical Security Systems
  • Risk Management & Reduction
  • Security Documentation

Certifications:

  • SWAT & Drug Enforcement Training
  • Certified Drug Enforcement Trainer
  • First Responder & CPR Certified
  • Piston & Shotgun LE Instructor
  • Tactical Shooting LE Instructor
  • Range Safety Officer
  • Advanced Tactical Pistol & Assault Rifle
  • Antiterrorism Officer Level II

Welding

Veritas Drilling Welding Services

Veritas welding offers the advantages of hiring a professional welding company with the equipment to complete any project within all of our service areas.  We offer all of the following processes:

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by an inert shielding gas (argon or helium), and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds, do not require it. A constant-current welding power supply produces energy which is conducted across the arc through a column of highly ionized gas and metal vapors known as a plasma.

GTAW is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and copper alloys. The process grants the operator greater control over the weld than competing processes such as shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding, allowing for stronger, higher quality welds. However, GTAW is comparatively more complex and difficult to master, and furthermore, it is significantly slower than most other welding techniques.

Gas metal arc welding (GMAW), sometimes referred to by its subtypes metal inert gas (MIG) welding or metal active gas (MAG) welding, is a welding process in which an electric arc forms between a consumable wire electrode and the workpiece metal(s), which heats the workpiece metal(s), causing them to melt, and join. Along with the wire electrode, a shielding gas feeds through the welding gun, which shields the process from contaminants in the air.  The process can be semi-automatic or automatic. A constant voltage, direct current power source is most commonly used with GMAW, but constant current systems, as well as alternating current, can be used. There are four primary methods of metal transfer in GMAW, called globular, short-circuiting, spray, and pulsed-spray, each of which has distinct properties and corresponding advantages and limitations.  Originally developed for welding aluminum and other non-ferrous materials in the 1940s, GMAW was soon applied to steels because it provided faster welding time compared to other welding processes. The cost of inert gas limited its use in steels until several years later, when the use of semi-inert gases such as carbon dioxide became common. Further developments during the 1950s and 1960s gave the process more versatility and as a result, it became a highly used industrial process. Today, GMAW is the most common industrial welding process, preferred for its versatility, speed and the relative ease of adapting the process to robotic automation. Unlike welding processes that do not employ a shielding gas, such as shielded metal arc welding, it is rarely used outdoors or in other areas of air volatility. A related process, flux cored arc welding, often does not use a shielding gas, but instead employs an electrode wire that is hollow and filled with flux.

One of the most common types of arc welding is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), which is also known as manual metal arc welding (MMAW) or stick welding, as shown above.  An electric current is used to strike an arc between the base material and a consumable electrode rod or stick. The electrode rod is made of a material that is compatible with the base material being welded and is covered with a flux that gives off vapors that serve as a shielding gas and provide a layer of slag, both of which protect the weld area from atmospheric contamination. The electrode core itself acts as filler material, making a separate filler unnecessary. The process is very versatile, requiring little operator training and inexpensive equipment. However, weld times are rather slow, since the consumable electrodes must be frequently replaced and because slag, the residue from the flux, must be chipped away after welding. Furthermore, the process is generally limited to welding ferrous materials, though specialty electrodes have made possible the welding of cast iron, nickel, aluminum, copper and other metals. The versatility of the method makes it popular in a number of applications including repair work and construction.